Sorry that I’m sorry

1/26/16

Know the phrase “sorry, not sorry”? That is so not my issue.

My problem is I say “sorry” way too often. I need a stand in adjective at this point!

I say it to my boyfriend all the time…I don’t even know why! I say it when not grabbing my stuff fast enough out a friend’s car- and then apologized for apologizing saying “gosh I say ‘sorry’ too often”. She heartily agreed!

But today I said it in rising anger. I was on the phone, for the umpteenth time with a new issue regarding my Dad’s passing. When the supervisor tried to placate me (but not provide any help) by saying “Ma’am, I’m sorry- I know how frustrated you must be”.

Roar. 

I went a little something like this: “No. No, you do NOT know how I feel right now. Myself and (third party) have called this organization multiple times and spent countless hours on various hiccups that you throw our way. Now, you are asking me to jump through yet another hoop? Why is this the first time we are hearing of this delay when we rightly request it? Why do none of my legal titles in this situation help, yet you had me file various documents, send fax upon fax, just to not resolve this? I am SORRY, but you do NOT know how I feel”.

So this time, it’s obvious that I’m not sorry. Having someone you love pass is hard enough without endless bureaucracy and circuitous policies. (True example: I am dealing with a government agency to get tax information for another government agency, but I must go to court to get said information. WHAT?) Plus, I KNOW I am not the first person who has had a loved one die and needs to filing taxes, forms, and other necessities. Insult to injury, my Dad was one of the most thorough and prepared people- and still this craziness occurs.

The best part was the validation of the calm third party on the phone who I called to speak with after (…ok, to say sorry I lost it a bit). He said “No, I didn’t want to stop you on the phone. You have every right to be frustrated with them. I have never heard needing to do what they are asking of you”.

Am I still angry? You betcha. Am I exhausted from months of fighting? Heck yes. Am I sorry? Hell to the No.

And maybe that is my lesson for today. #sorrynotsorry is my new stand-in.

Room

We are selling my childhood home. Nothing about this is easy, not purging 30+ years of stuff, not cleaning every nook and cranny, not praying that you can get enough for your Mom. It’s a long goodbye, filled with lots of things to do.

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These green chairs I am taking with me. But today, they sit oddly in my old bedroom. Oddly because they always stood firmly in our living room, not in my small space. But as I looked at this picture I took today, I realized it is special. My dad spent nearly every day after his diagnosis while at home in one of these chairs. It was here that he was able to think, chat, sometimes write, and share with friends. It is here, as a child, I remember him reading the newspaper, or as in my teenage years, listening to my fears, worries, hopes and desires.

So even though it is strange to see these chairs in my old room, the oddity is sweet. It’s a reminder of my dad and I, the bond that can’t be broken by disease or death. While I would give anything to just sit in those chairs with him again, I have this clear vision given by this picture to bring to my mind when I miss Dad and want to talk with him. I can be in the comfort of my childhood bedroom, with new paint and little furniture, and our chatting chairs.

My room, my space, now filled with new visuals for me. And that is a gift.

 

New territory, before and after

March 7, 2016

First blog post of the year, and it is March. How time flies while ever so standing still.

 

The lines are becoming more solidly before and after. No longer “before diagnosis and after” but before Dad’s passing and after. There was so much to do after your death, Dad. It frustrates me, a wordy (ok even though rarely pithy) being, that I can’t articulate every aspect, struggle, fight, and policy we had to overcome to put down the business side of death and move on to the mourning side.

 

And what infuriates me is that I can never seem to explain all the “what” is- but it’s headache filled bureaucracy most days.

Part of the issue is having to do all this while mourning such a loss as the death of a parent, all while we still want to focus on Mom and her Alzheimer’s. So many friends of my age said “I don’t know how you would have done this WITH a job too”. And I didn’t- it was my job.

 

Plus, this landscape was so utterly foreign. You were always my guide in the realm of financial and legal. Let alone big changes in life, you and Mom were often steady guides. And now there is none. And now I stand without you both. I stand with myself and my memories of you.

 

Maybe this is part of the rebirth after death. Not so much that I know a deeper loss in life, but rather it has fully, and rather expediently, christened me in adulthood. In one phone call, one night of you lying on a gurney, our roles swapped at a vibrant 65 and days into 29.

 

Today, just two years later, I am settling into my new routine, including a new job, a new commute,

All seems new.

Then something may send me back- remembering how acute this loss is- how permanent and still fresh. Tonight’s moment came with a beautiful, simple letter from a friend reminding me that they hold my loss in their heart.

 

And I’m back. Knowing full well this sorrow and sobbing place. My body could throttle into the continuance of ordinary life, but my soul still needs these remembrances. These releases.

 

I will always wish for more time, to know what you’re thinking about on this world event or that piece I read, to still have you here. And, I will forever be grateful for the time we did have, for the love you instilled and the memories we all made,

 

I miss you, Dad. I miss you, now and each tomorrow too.

Celebrate me home

Still so true.

Tonight, we shared Christmas Eve with our good friend and her family. It was kind and casual, warm and inviting. The food was delicious and the company even better.

Yes, this Christmas may very well be one of the toughest as we still very acutely miss and mourn Dad.

So, we say thanks for the blessings, ask for help with the sorrow, and share love wherever we can, especially those in most need.

Amen.

Say Yes! Change Things.

November  30th, 2012

Today, I did something I never thought I’d do. I heard the first Christmas song of the season… and I cried.

Not a Hallmark-card-just-a-glisten-of-a-tear in your eye. No. This was a  shoulder rocking,a streaming down the cheeks, full out sob.

Even worse, the culprit was a Kenny Loggins song. I know, I KNOW, even I’m saying, “What?! KATE!”

Honestly, it was the end of a long day, a tough commute, and too much introspection. Plus, the lyrics made me think about Mom and future Christmases. Those moments that I know will come.

So. I cry. Even if I can’t be footloose and fancy free (please I had to throw in that one), I can let the moment be.

Plus, laugh that a woman looses it over lines like “let’s turn on the love light in the place” … has become me.

December 24th, 2012

I…

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It’s not a love story

3/14/15

It’s not the two of them.
It’s not the beauty or the partnership that two people have.
It’s not what we all want.

It’s a robbery. It’s not a gift.
It’s ugly destruction of the mind, but never the spirit.

But it’s not love. It’s love in spite of it.

Love in the depths of an ongoing battle. Love whilst losing, forgetting, and regaining. Love through pestilence.

It’s not a love story. It’s a story, woven with commitment, loyalty and love.

But death is not their love story.

Their life together is.

winter sullen wonder days

I ran into my high school history teacher today. Moseying around a Barnes and Noble, I looked up and excitedly said her name.

We chatted for a moment when she asked how my family was holding up. Friends now on Facebook, she knew of my Dad’s passing. I immediately said what was on my mind: “Oh, how I wish I could call him up and say “I ran into Myrna’ “!

My teacher, one I had the pleasure of having for three out of four years, shared beautiful wisdom with me. “Oh Kate, he is there. Talk to him. I lost my father 10 years ago and I still speak to him”. And I agreed. I said, “I know he  laughs at me still!”

***

Later this evening, I replayed a song I heard live on Monday night: “Winter Song”. I doubt anything could more aptly describe this holiday season for me. It is a mixture of deep sadness but small joy for the season and the future to come.

I will honor your memory, Dad. I will find my way. Love will find a way…I am just not sure how.

Reflecting on emotions

Emotions. Good and/or Bad.

I wish I had cried more with my Dad. In front of him. I vividly remember the news announcing that this ordinary time transformed into worst day of my life. But the actual moments in the hospital, with Dad, are hazy.

Given who were both are (I can’t write were), we jumped into the problem-solving. “Here are the bills that you need to pay each month, and these are the ones that are on auto-pay. The plumber is coming on Tuesday. Cancel my tennis match and or see if someone can get me a sub. Let the church know that I can’t deliver communion this weekend. This is where I keep ‘xyz’ information. Keep Mom at home as long as possible….just in case”. We were leaping into action, him on a gurney and me filling three pages of loose-leaf paper from my finance class earlier in the day. We plugged the holes in this massive life change, just to slow the tide, to make this incredible shift a bit more bearable. More manageable. Because Dad and I like to manage. Fix. Solve.

But did I cry? I don’t recall. I am sure that I teared up, after talking about all that he needed me to do, and when we got to the “just in case….you know how much I love you”s.

Of course we were in shock and didn’t know what would occur in the next day with surgery or in the year to come. But I wish I found ways to emote more with my Dad. Just so that he could be my Dad, not the patient, not the suddenly sick man, not someone who needed us to take over so much of his life. But just my Dad and his youngest daughter.

This is not a regret….because HECK NO, Dad was big on “have no regrets in life”. He meant this from a “don’t dwell on something that happened. Rather learn from it and move on” mentality. And I strongly value this ideal- experience, reflect, and if need be change as you go forward; but don’t regret.  I know that in those moments, I was fully being me. As I look back and miss my Dad, of course I don’t miss the “here’s the paperwork on that bill” conversations. I miss connecting with my Dad, sharing my heart, my feelings, my love, and my emotions with him. And because I can’t have that in the same physical way anymore, I wish I found more ways to do it previously.

The  irony is, this is exactly the opposite of what I am doing with Mom. I want to protect her from my tears, from my sadness. And while she is still my Mom, I can’t share this pain with her due to Alzheimer’s. Mostly, I am grateful for the glimmer of grace I see in this situation- that maybe Mom is spared this huge sorrow of loosing Dad. But I miss her too. And I want to see no pain, such as this knowledge, fallen on her.

Sitting with her today, the aging musician wowing us with his piano skills, I felt so deeply. It was a raining, dreary day. One both Mom and I hate. I wanted to be able to miss Dad with her, to show emotion, to be able to comfort each other. And while I am firm in our family decision to not bring this sadness on to Mom, isn’t does’t make me wish any less that she could be here, right now in that way.

Welcome the other

“…even as we extend, welcome, we often deeply fear of the other. This idea of how do assimilate, and assimilate difference, I think this is still the essential question of American culture and we struggle with this today”. – Prof. Nancy Schultz, Salem State University
While listening to a podcast I love, Backstory, I heard this very poignant statement. Later, I went to hear Nicolas Kristof speak and he mentioned the concept of the ’empathy gap’. This idea that we struggle putting ourselves in other people’s shoes and may instead judge them harshly.
I don’t have all the answers, but I sit with these thoughts today. I’d rather welcome then shut-out. I’d rather love then hate. I’d rather find any area of space then say the inn is full.
To listen to the episode called, Catholics in America visit http://backstoryradio.org/shows/catholics-in-america/ .

Of loss on 9/11

Fourteen years ago, I recall hearing the news about the World Trade Center and other attacks. I remember walking into religion class thinking about all those who had lost their loved ones.

Moments later I recalled that Dad took the PATH train that morning. And that he said goodbye to me, meaning he was later to work than usual. I had a few hours of fear and then learned he was ok, but it was nearly a week before I was able to lay eyes on him, or before he came home.

Dad would rarely talk about 9/11 and the effect it had on him. I know he took his employees to safety, kept distributing water, and that he slept under his desk that night three blocks away, again so he could work at a moment’s notice.

I also think of his recollection of walking out on the streets of lower Manhattan on September 12th and the sad, eerie vacancy that stretched before him.

Fourteen years later, we brought my Dad to his final resting place. I am grateful for every moment of time that I had with him, both before and after.

I wish I had better words on a momentous day, but I don’t. They will come, but for right now I will honor the memory of my Dad and all who have gone before him.

Let peace reign. For this, we need.

In and of the world

How do we be of the world, moved by what is occurring around us, but not paralyzed? I have no easy answers, but my last few months have been so impacted by my own family’s suffering I found myself shutting out the world.I could not take more sadness, grief or suffering. So I muted the noise of the world.

Mostly, I do not want to live in this disconnected way. However, I realize that in order to process my own pain, I needed to limit the amount of ‘extra’ burden I place on myself.

But today, as I sit at my beloved Dad’s beside, waiting for the few moments of wakefulness to provide him conversation or food, I read. I spend more time researching the current crisises that are leading so many to flee their homes. How do we help, in the immediate, but also in the longer term to prevent such atrocities as three year-old Aylan lying lifeless on a foreign shoreline?

**

In my own pain, one of the most striking emotions I have felt is gratitude.  Not only for having my Dad these last decades years but also for all the blessings I have had because of him and my Mom throughout my life. I am deeply sad but also very grateful. And because of this gratitude, I care. I care because I see the luck I was born into- the freedoms I have, the material goods and supportive people in my life. I do not take this for granted.

In the midst of pain, I care. I care about what happens to others in this great big world of ours. This Earth is a shared space and I care.

And that caring should lead us to action. To welcome those into a new home, to implore our governments to call for a no-fly zone in Syria to also allow people back into their homeland, and provide any other means of support.

**

I miss my Dad. We would have talked about this criss, what history led to this moment, why we aren’t seeing change, and what we can do to help. We would have talked about our sadness and disappointment, our faith and how this makes us struggle.

All of us expect our parents to pass before us. I am not ready, but know I probably never would be. No parent should ever have outlive their child, nor have to risk such horrible circumstances to find a safer home for their families.

Let us be connected. Let us find empathy in our hearts during tragedy and find ways to act.